MCAT

Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems

  • Duration:
    95 minutes
  • Description:
    This section asks you to combine your knowledge of foundational concepts in the biological and biochemical sciences with your scientific inquiry, reasoning, and research and statistics skills to solve problems that demonstrate readiness for medical school. Understanding the processes unique to living organisms, such as growing and reproducing, maintaining a constant internal environment, acquiring materials and energy, sensing and responding to environmental changes, and adapting, is important to the study of medicine. You will be tested on your knowledge of how cells and organ systems within an organism act both independently and in concert to accomplish these processes, as well as your ability to reason about these processes at various levels of biological organization within a living system.

Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems

  • Duration:
    95 minutes
  • Description:
    This section asks you to combine your knowledge of foundational concepts in the chemical and physical sciences with your scientific inquiry, reasoning, and research and statistics skills to solve problems that demonstrate readiness for medical school. Understanding the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of tissues, organs, and organ systems is important to the study of medicine. You will be tested on your knowledge of the basic chemical and physical principles that underlie the mechanisms operating in the human body, and your ability to apply an understanding of these general principles to living systems.

Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior

  • Duration:
    95 Minutes
  • Description:
    This section tests your knowledge and use of the concepts in psychology, sociology, biology, research methods, and statistics that provide a solid foundation for learning in medical school about the behavioral and socio-cultural determinants of health and health outcomes. Understanding the behavioral and socio-cultural determinants of health is important to the study of medicine. You will be tested on your knowledge of the ways in which psychological, social, and biological factors influence perceptions and reactions to the world; behavior, and behavior change; what people think about themselves and others; the cultural and social differences that influence well-being; and the relationships between social stratification, access to resources, and well-being.

Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

  • Duration:
    90 Minutes
  • Description:
    This section asks you to critically analyze information from a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines. Specific knowledge of these disciplines is not required for this section; all of the information you will need appears in the passages provided. Among the areas from which content is drawn are ethics and philosophy, cultural studies, and population health.

Eligibility Criteria

  • Min. Qualification:
    10+2
  • Qualifying Subjects:
    Either you are fresh out of 10+2 or have just finished with your MBBS degree in both the cases you are eligible to appear for MCAT.

In most cases, you should take the exam in the calendar year prior to the year in which you plan to enter medical school (so that, for example, if you are applying in 2013 for entrance to medical school in 2014, you should take the exam in 2013). If you are trying to determine whether you should take the exam early in the year or later, you should ask yourself a couple of questions:
Will I take the exam just once or is there a possibility I may want to take it again?
Have I mastered the material or do I need additional coursework or study?
If you think that you will take the exam more than once in a given calendar year, you may want to make your first attempt in January, March, April, or May. This should allow you sufficient time to receive your scores, make a decision about your second attempt, and find an available seat later in the testing year. Seats fill up quickly, especially near the end of the year, so the earlier you test and make a decision about a second attempt, the higher the likelihood that a seat will be available for you later. But don't test too early if you are just not ready. If you have coursework to complete, additional studying to do, or you have a major conflict that will not allow you to be in the right frame of mind for the exam, we suggest you wait until you are better prepared. This may mean you make your first attempt in June or July. That's OK, too. You are the best judge of your preparedness.